Raising the SaaS Onboarding Bar for Niche Segments: RIAs and Software Frustrations

According to a recent survey of RIAs by Trust Company of America and TechValidate, advisors are not satisfied with the value they receive from their software. Almost half said that they couldn’t use it to its full capacity and more than a third complained that it couldn’t be customized to meet their needs. This data highlights the fact that even if you believe you have designed a product to target a specific market segment, there is no less of a need to properly set expectations in the sales process and invest in engaging and onboarding customers.

For the advisor market—especially RIAs, who may not have much of a technical staff to support them—the profile of the user makes this need particularly acute. Smart, used to moving quickly and strapped for time, these customers will have little patience for inefficiency and delays in going live and in finding out they were given misleading promises in the sales process. The actions and communications pre- and immediately post-sale will either put these customers on a positive trajectory for success and strong lifetime value or on a path to dissatisfaction.

In our experience, the keys to reaching and influencing RIAs are:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of them and their business.
  • Respect the fact that any time not spent working with existing clients or finding new ones is time wasted.
  • Communicate in plain language and facts, not marketing-speak and fluff.

SaaS businesses, obviously including those targeting RIAs and other niche customer groups, need to ensure customer success to maximize the retention and upsell opportunities that are necessary to turn a profit on acquisition. But like any revenue generation opportunity, this requires investment—in time, personnel, and money. In a niche segment, it doesn’t become easier to satisfy, but rather harder as the bar gets higher for the knowledge and experience necessary to “talk the talk” and “walk the walk”.

Notes from InVest 2017: From Fear of Robos to Hybrid Optimization

When you attend a conference that has a particular thematic focus two years in a row, you have the opportunity to observe the progression of the discussion. InVest 2017, following on the inaugural InVest 2016, very much offered this opportunity.

From my perspective, 2016 was about the retirement advice industry coming to terms with digital advice and moving from seeing human and digital advice channels as competitors to seeing them as complementary. By the 2017 conference, the attendees had come to recognize and understand the necessity of a hybrid model and now were focused on how to manage and optimize that hybrid structure. Two discussion panels exemplified the new focus:

The Empire Strikes Back had a panel of senior executives from large financial services companies (Citi, UBS, Bank of America/Merrill Lynch, and JP Morgan). They all talked about the need to start from a place of understanding the business opportunity offered by digital—an improved client experience, increased efficiency, cross-selling—and to use that understanding to shape digital advice strategy. Throughout the session, the panelists repeatedly highlighted both the opportunity and risks that face big advice providers. The opportunity is to leverage technology to enhance and build new relationships; the risk is that existing clients could be turned off. Specific comments from the panelists illustrate these dynamics:

  • “The industry is moving from product distribution to client relationship management and digital is a big part of that new delivery model.” (Venu Krishnamurthy, Head of Citigold, Citipriority, Citi Personal Wealth Management)
  • “We learned that we couldn’t just rely on our industry experience to deliver a strong digital experience; UI matters a lot.” (Richard Steinmeier, Head of Emerging Affluent and The Wealth Advice Center, UBS Wealth Management Americas)
  • “Clients don’t just use us for one thing, so we have to think about digital advice in the context of overall relationship and be aware of how everything fits together.” (Kelli Keough, Global Head of Digital Wealth Management, JPMorgan Chase)
  • “You have to look at decisions about digital implementations on the basis of the value to client relationships.” (Aron Levine, Head of Consumer Banking and Merrill Edge, Bank of America)

In the Hybrid Strategy IRL (“in real life”) session, panelists from the front lines of client advice talked about how the foundation of the hybrid structure has to be the client and that technology should support, not hinder, the necessary and valued human interactions. In their words:

  • “You have to know who your clients are and how the technology will help you manage and deliver value in their eyes.” (Ryan Parker, CEO, Edelman Financial Services)
  • “Technology should be used to help advisors have better conversations, and to help deliver better outcomes. The guiding questions should be: “What can you automate?”, “What can you augment human with?”, “How do you segment?” (Ben Jones, Managing Director – Intermediary Distribution, BMO Global Asset Management)
  • “Don’t make the mistake of falling in love with the technology” because “our product is our experience…the rest is pipes and plumbing.” (Parker)
  • “Always go back to question: how does it help the client experience?” (Paul Duval, President, Genesis Wealth Advisors)
  • “Technology is empowering. [Clients value our ability] to have tough conversations. The more efficiently we can get “housekeeping” done, the more time we have for those conversations.” (Duval)

As this year’s InVest approaches it will be interesting to see the current state of thinking about the hybrid model, and how far down the road of grappling with the strategic and operational challenges that will likely come with implementing the model companies have come.

Issuers Report Strong Credit Card Loan Growth Across FICO Segments in 2017

According to the latest FDIC Quarterly Banking Profile, U.S. credit card loan growth accelerated in 4Q17, rising 8.2% to $865 billion.

Given the strong overall growth in credit card receivables, are issuers focusing their growth ambitions on particular FICO Score categories? To address this question, EMI analyzed 10K SEC filings for leading credit card issuers.  Overall, we found that issuers reported strong credit card loan growth across their FICO Score segments. We also studied trends in different issuer categories.

  • In the aftermath of the Financial Crisis, the three leading issuersChase, Bank of America and Citi—focused attention away from near-prime and sub-prime segments and towards superprime consumers.  This led to significant declines in both outstandings and charge-off rates.  More recently, as economic growth and consumer confidence returned, these issuers have refocused on loan growth and are once again targeting lower FICO Score segments.  This is seen in the chart below that shows changes in outstandings by FICO Score segment between end-2016 and end-2017.  As these issuers are pursuing loan growth, their credit card net charge-off rates have also increased (+26 bps y/y at Bank of America, +30 bps to at Chase, +59 bps at Citi-Branded Cards North America).  However, charge-off rates remained below 3% for each of these issuers in 4Q17, and issuers should continue to focus on loan growth while charge-off rates continue at these low levels.

  • Second-tier national credit card issuers—Discover, Capital One and Synchrony—reported relatively strong growth, but with different FICO Score segment trends.  Discover reported 9% y/y growth, with no y/y change in share of outstandings for the <660 and 600+ segments.  Capital One had a similar overall growth rate (8%), but this was driven in part by the acquisition of the Cabela’s card portfolio, which boosted the >660 FICO segment’s share of outstandings.  It is also worth noting that the <660 FICO segment accounted for 34% of Capital One’s credit card portfolio at the end of 2017, compared to 25% of Synchrony’s portfolio, and 18% at Discover.

  • Regional credit card issuers present a mixed picture when it comes to the FICO Score segment composition of their credit card portfolios. This is driven by a number of factors, including a large variation in portfolio sizes, as well as their credit card underwriting standards.  Most issuers report growth across their portfolios, with strong growth rates in the low FICO Score segments.  Fifth Third reported very strong growth for its <660 segment, but this segment only accounts for 3% of its portfolio.  Regions’ 20% growth in its <620 FICO segment was driven by its launch of a credit secured card in July 2017.

Finally, as most issuers reported strong growth in their credit card portfolios in 2017, charge-off rates are also on the rise, growing 45 bps y/y to 3.61% at the end of 2017.  While the overall charge-off rate has risen from a low of 2.19% in 3Q15, it is down both from post-recessionary highs of 13.13% in 1Q10, and even the 4% levels in 2007, prior to the Financial Crisis.  With charge-off rates still below 4%, the leading issuers continue to be comfortable with promoting credit card loan growth.